Latest from the Newman Society

30 Years Later, Notre Dame Has Learned Nothing

Proving that they’ve learned absolutely nothing from the scandal when they honored President Barack Obama in 2009, the University of Notre Dame recently honored former Indiana Gov. Joseph Kernan with one of its highest honors despite his public advocacy for the legalization of abortion. The university honored Kernan with its 2018 Rev. Edward F. Sorin, […]

What Would A Justice Kavanaugh Mean for Catholic Education?

The nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court Justice has ignited storms of protests from the left, mostly centered around the issue of abortion. But another issue promises to be the focus of some harsh questioning in the near future — Catholic schools. I’ve long believed that the fate of this country is tied […]

Homeschooling as a Means to Rebuilding Catholic Culture

The following was originally given as a talk to the Calgary Catholic Homeschooling group. My wife and I have been teaching our kids at home for about eight years. I recall vividly when the idea of educating at home turned into a conviction. We were back in Saskatchewan, newly married, newly graduated, and preparing for […]

Trojan Textbooks: Beware of Government Bearing Gifts

New Mexico’s Supreme Court is reconsidering a 2015 ruling which ended the state funding of textbooks for private schools. Is this good news? As a publisher of textbooks produced specifically for Catholic schools, I am conflicted in answering the question. On the one hand, state money provides a large well of cash for schools to […]

Choosing a Catholic School Begins with Mission

With Catholic Schools Week upon us (Jan. 28-Feb. 3), families are invited to recommit to Catholic education and register their children for the upcoming school year. Others who are exploring Catholic schools may benefit from a new Parents Guide to understanding the nature and benefits of a faithful, excellent Catholic education. The higher graduation rates […]

clash with police

Why We Teach Catholics the Truth

The argument for faithful Catholic education is most apparent in humanity’s worst moments. It’s then that we realize how greatly our culture needs men and women full of virtue, wisdom, and reverence to help lead us to God. And we need Catholic homes, schools, and colleges that form young people for that task. The terrible […]

The Land O’ Lakes Statement Has Caused Devastation For 50 Years

In hindsight, what they did was appalling. But when several Catholic university leaders gathered in the summer of 1967 at a remote retreat in Land O’ Lakes, Wisconsin, did they fully anticipate the consequences of their vision for “modern” Catholic education? Hopefully not. It was 50 years ago, on July 20-23, when Notre Dame’s Father […]

Aquinas College

Nashville Dominicans Turn Focus Entirely to Teacher Formation

A few years ago, Sister Mary Sarah Galbraith, OP, and her team at Nashville’s Aquinas College set out to build a four-year, traditional college by expanding disciplines beyond nursing and education and building a residential campus. In many respects, they found significant success, and their accomplishments suggest real opportunities for colleges that strongly embrace their […]

Student Group Big

Bishop Flores: What Every Catholic Kid Needs for School

Does “Catholic education” begin in Catholic schools—or is there something more foundational? Bishop Daniel Flores of Brownsville, Texas, has an intriguing answer. Last week, in his St. Hildegard Lecture at the University of Mary in Bismarck, North Dakota, Bishop Flores argued that there are “habits of the soul” that, when developed “prior to formal education,” help students […]

thomas aquinas college chapel

One Catholic College Temporarily Closes, But Another Springs Up

In 2008, the cover of Commonweal magazine proclaimed this headline: “Catholic to the Core: How One College Does It.” It celebrated the 10-course, four-year core curriculum and strong commitment to liberal education at Saint Joseph’s College in Rensselaer, Ind. But last week, Saint Joseph’s announced that it would temporarily shut down its main campus with hopes of erasing its debt and […]

Scalia and Gorsuch: Both Lamented ‘Liberalism’ in Catholic Education

When President Donald Trump said he would nominate a Supreme Court justice in the mold of Justice Antonin Scalia, who died one year ago on Feb. 13, everyone knew that meant someone who shares Scalia’s originalist philosophy of constitutional law. But who expected that the appointee, Neil Gorsuch, would be another Georgetown graduate? And one who apparently once […]

Georgetown University from observatory, Washington, D.C.

‘Exorcist’ Author’s Canon Law Case Against Georgetown Continues

William Peter Blatty, best-selling author and Academy Award-winning screenwriter of The Exorcist, died Thursday at the age of 89 after battling a form of blood cancer. But his final work is still underway: a petition to the Vatican, seeking the enforcement of canon law to reform Georgetown University’s Catholic identity, is still in front of the Church’s highest […]

Father Michael Scanlan, T.O.R.

Father Scanlan Was America’s Pastor to Catholic Higher Education

Father Michael Scanlan, T.O.R., who died Saturday, reformed Franciscan University of Steubenville and built it into one of America’s most faithful and vibrant centers of Catholic learning. He is rightly acknowledged as a foremost leader in the renewal of Catholic higher education. More than that, I think it is fitting that he be remembered as […]

Capitol Building

Resist This Compromise That Would Crush Catholics

Catholics hoped for a reprieve from assaults on religious freedom following the November elections, but a very serious threat looms with so-called SOGI laws. That’s why 80 Christian leaders — including four leading Catholic bishops and many Catholic education leaders — chose to make a bold statement this week rejecting such efforts as contrary to Christian and […]

Gerard V. Bradley: Common Core Catastrophe

Editor’s Note: This guest commentary by University of Notre Dame Law Professor Gerard V. Bradley was originally published on November 15, 2016, at Public Discourse, an online publication of the Witherspoon Institute, and is reprinted here with permission. Pyrotechnics about unsecured e-mails, groping, pay-to-play, and multiple personality disorders suffocated what was—early in the 2016 election cycle—an […]